May 2, 2016 | Posted in Line-X Bay Area, Line-X Silicon Valley, Uncategorized

LINE-X of Bay Area and LINE-X of Silicon Valley provide protection where it counts for Stanford’s Humanoid Robotic Diver – “Mermaid”

Stanford's Humanoid Robotic Diver

Stanford’s Humanoid Robotic Diver Blocks

Stanford’s Humanoid Robotic Diver started out as a box of blocks about a year ago and has just made world news.

Humanoid Blocks

High Density Foam Blocks

Stanford’s Ocean One is the first prototype of what may be a team of robotic divers that are currently controlled remotely.   The advancement of processor technology and software make automation a certainly.  It’s only a matter of time before one of Ocean One’s distant beta versions will be task driven from a daily software boot and able to work independently.

 

 

As far as we are concerned it started like so many other projects – hey can you coat these.  Well let’s backup, it started out – A couple of Stanford students walk into LINE-X of Silicon Valley as ask, can you coat this sample material?  Concerns are always, how well does the media handle temperatures of LINE-X heated to 180 which becomes even hotter as the exothermic reaction of the ‘A’ and ‘B’ parts are mixed at 1800 – 2500 psi. The cool thing about LINE-X is one can use anything to create the shape – foam, paper cups, light bulbs, card board boxes, etc. Once the item is coated LINE-X provides the structure and the substrate is no longer needed. FOX business channel just did a segment on how indestructible and flexible LINE-X is. It’s the elongation, adherence, and wear resistance that make it unique.  Because of these properties, specifically flexibility and adherence that make LINE-X an excellent choice for Ocean One’s exoskeleton.

Humanoid Blocks

Coated with LINE-X Platinum no color coat

Stanford's Humanoid Robotic Diver after color coat

Stanford’s Humanoid Robotic Diver after color coat

For Ocean One, LINE-X of Silicon Valley and LINE-X of Bay Area coated parts using LINE-X Platinum which is 3 times stronger than Standard and has better permeability properties(resists water intrusion).  Always great to see a project come together – congratulations Stanford, specifically, the computer science dept that drove this to completion! Remember, from one salvage diver to another – our charter is the safe retrieval of lost objects.

 

 

Stanford's Robotic Diver

Stanford’s Robotic Diver